Topics

  • strict warning: Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically in /home4/portalt2/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module on line 879.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter::options_validate() should be compatible with views_handler::options_validate($form, &$form_state) in /home4/portalt2/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter.inc on line 589.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter::options_submit() should be compatible with views_handler::options_submit($form, &$form_state) in /home4/portalt2/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter.inc on line 589.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter_boolean_operator::value_validate() should be compatible with views_handler_filter::value_validate($form, &$form_state) in /home4/portalt2/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter_boolean_operator.inc on line 149.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_style_default::options() should be compatible with views_object::options() in /home4/portalt2/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_style_default.inc on line 25.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_row::options_validate() should be compatible with views_plugin::options_validate(&$form, &$form_state) in /home4/portalt2/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_row.inc on line 135.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_row::options_submit() should be compatible with views_plugin::options_submit(&$form, &$form_state) in /home4/portalt2/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_row.inc on line 135.
  • warning: Parameter 1 to tac_lite_node_grants() expected to be a reference, value given in /home4/portalt2/public_html/includes/module.inc on line 483.
  • warning: Parameter 1 to tac_lite_node_grants() expected to be a reference, value given in /home4/portalt2/public_html/includes/module.inc on line 483.
  • warning: Parameter 1 to tac_lite_node_grants() expected to be a reference, value given in /home4/portalt2/public_html/includes/module.inc on line 483.
  • warning: Parameter 1 to tac_lite_node_grants() expected to be a reference, value given in /home4/portalt2/public_html/includes/module.inc on line 483.
  • warning: Parameter 1 to tac_lite_node_grants() expected to be a reference, value given in /home4/portalt2/public_html/includes/module.inc on line 483.
Broadly speaking, we can study the past using texts and material culture. Documentary sources (texts) offer opinions and judgments of what people in the past thought, and are invaluable for studying historic periods. Material culture, on the other hand, provides an insight in what past societies did. Moreover, archaeology, the study of the past through material remains, provides the only approach to those societies without texts, as well as offering an important tool for the study of historic periods. This unit explains the major concepts, practices and methods of archaeology.
Just as today's contemporary society is best understood within the context of changing environmental issues, so too cultural patterns of the past make much more sense if they are seen as interacting with physical features and related climatic elements. This unit introduces the main geographical features of Mesopotamia, Egypt and Anatolia, which together account for a large part of the ancient Near East.
Egypt of the Pharaohs is a period of history to which many can relate. Massive pyramids, legendary figures and wealth are among the more commonplace images of dynastic Egypt. Equally exciting and no less important is Egypt's formative period, especially its late pre-dynastic times. This unit will examine how Egypt became a unified country and introduce some of the more important characters.
Among the most important inventions, writing must rank among the top. Imagine a world without writing — no books, no newspapers, and no text messaging! But how did it all begin? And where was writing invented? This unit looks at the emergence of writing systems in Mesopotamia and Egypt. It explains how the cuneiform script and hieroglyphs developed out of earlier systems of pictographs.
Is it possible to comprehend ancient art the way one would appreciate contemporary art? Did the ancients believe in art for art's sake? Using the art of the Assyrians, in particular the stone panels that lined their palaces, this unit explains how to interpret ancient art and understand its function. It also explains how art is inextricably linked to the concepts of empire, religion and ideology.
Well before the Illiad and the Odyssey were written down, the peoples of Mesopotamia narrated stories of cunning heroes and gods, adventure and friendship, death and immortality. First impressed on clay tablets in the third millennium BC, they continued to be copied and embellished for hundreds of years. This unit will examine the Epic of Gilgamesh, a masterpiece of literature, which tells of the adventures of the renowned king of the city of Uruk in Mesopotamia and his wild-man friend Enkidu.